Nutritional status and nutrient intake from complementary foods among breastfed children in Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia

Main Article Content

Endang Dewi Lestari
T Ninuk S Hartini
M Hakimi
A Surjono

Abstract

Background The growth rate of Indonesian infants beyond six
months of age declines compared with that of the international
reference population.
Objective This study aimed to describe the pattern of nutritional
status among breastfed children and their intake of energy, pro-
tein, and zinc from complementary foods in Purworejo District, Cen-
tral Java, Indonesia.
Methods The study was a cross sectional survey drawing breastfed
children under 24 months old from a well-defined population. Chil-
dren with a history of prematurity or low birth weight were excluded.
Anthropometrical measurements were collected. Intake of comple-
mentary food was assessed using 24-hour recall. Analysis of nu-
tritional intake was only performed in 11-23 month-old children.
Results Of 577 children enrolled, the prevalence of underweight,
stunting, and wasting were 8.1%, 8.8%, and 4.6%, respectively.
The prevalence of undernutrition increased with age. There was
no association between frequency of breastfeeding during 24 hours
in the second year of life and the nutritional status. The average
intake of energy, protein, and zinc from complementary foods was
very low i.e., 30%, 45%, and 5% of the Indonesian recommended
dietary allowance (RDA), respectively.
Conclusion The prevalence of undernutrition in breastfed chil-
dren increases with age. The breastfed children beyond 11 months
of age in Purworejo District need sufficient density of nutrients from
complementary foods.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Lestari E, Hartini TN, Hakimi M, Surjono A. Nutritional status and nutrient intake from complementary foods among breastfed children in Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia. PI [Internet]. 10Oct.2016 [cited 20Sep.2019];45(1):31-. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/795
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Endang Dewi Lestari

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Sebelas Maret
Univesity, Surakarta, Indonesia.

T Ninuk S Hartini

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Sebelas Maret
Univesity, Surakarta, Indonesia.

M Hakimi

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Sebelas Maret
Univesity, Surakarta, Indonesia.

A Surjono

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Sebelas Maret
Univesity, Surakarta, Indonesia.
Received 2016-10-05
Accepted 2016-10-05
Published 2016-10-10

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