Clinical manifestations of childhood asthma persisting until the age of seven

  • Rini Asterina
  • Sjawitri P Siregar
  • Bambang Madiyono
  • Bambang Supriyatno
Keywords: risk factor, persisting asthma, children, the age of seven, cigarrette smoke exposure, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis

Abstract

Background Asthma is a chronic illness commonly found in chil-
dren. We aimed to find out the clinical manifestations of childhood
asthma persisting until the age of seven and the influencing factors.
Methods A review was performed at the outpatient clinic of the
Department of Child Health Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Jakarta,
from January 1992 to December 2001, on children with asthma
who still had symptoms until the age of seven.
Results During the period of 10 years, there were 322 children
with clinical symptoms of asthma persisting until the age of 7. One
hundred and forty-six (45.3%) met the inclusion criteria, consisting
of 75 (51.4%) boys and 71 (48.6%) girls. The average age was
11.7 years. There were 101 (69.2%) patients with rare episodic
asthma, 26.0% with frequent episodic asthma, and 4.8% with per-
sistent asthma. Age of onset was mostly beyond 3 year-old (51%).
Besides asthma, atopic diseases noted in these patients were al-
lergic rhinitis in 85 (58.2%) and atopic dermatitis in 42 (28.8%).
Logistic regression found that cigarette smoke exposure (adjusted
OR 4.72, 95%CI 2.05;10.87, p=0.000), allergic rhinitis (adjusted
OR 3.44, 95%CI 1.40;8.45, p=0.007), and atopic dermatitis (ad-
justed OR 2.37, 95%CI 1.01;5.72, p=0.048) had significant asso-
ciation with the degree of asthma.
Conclusion Of 146 children who still had asthma until the age of
seven, there were 69% with rare episodic asthma, 26% with fre-
quent episodic asthma, and 4.8% with persistent asthma. Factors
presumably influencing this manifestations were cigarette smoke
exposure, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis

Author Biographies

Rini Asterina
Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Jakarta.
Sjawitri P Siregar
Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Jakarta.
Bambang Madiyono
Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Jakarta.
Bambang Supriyatno
Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Jakarta.

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Published
2016-10-10
How to Cite
1.
Asterina R, Siregar S, Madiyono B, Supriyatno B. Clinical manifestations of childhood asthma persisting until the age of seven. PI [Internet]. 10Oct.2016 [cited 18Apr.2024];44(1):1-. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/724
Section
Articles
Received 2016-09-28
Accepted 2016-09-28
Published 2016-10-10