Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with microcephaly

Main Article Content

Irawan Mangunatmadja
Dwi Putro Widodo
Hardiono D Pusponegoro

Abstract

Background Hearing loss (HL) is commonly found in children
with microcephaly. The aim of this study was to reveal hearing loss
and auditory brainstem pathways disorders in children with micro-
cephaly and other handicaps.
Methods There were 194 children who were referred for hearing
evaluation. Subjects with history of congenital perinatal infection
(TORCH) were excluded. Data were collected from the results of
Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEP) recordings, includ-
ing sex, age, clinical manifestations, latency and interlatency be-
tween waves I, III, V, and the hearing levels of each ear.
Results Moderate to profound HL were found in fourteen ears
(58%) of patients with microcephaly. Moderate to profound HL (28%)
and endocochlear damage (15%) were found in the ears of pa-
tients with microcephaly and delayed speech. Moderate to pro-
found HL (39%) and endocochlear damage (11%) were detected
in the ears of patients with microcephaly and delayed develop-
ment. Moderate to profound HL (21%) and endocochlear damage
(16%) were found in the ears of microcephalic patients with both
delayed speech and delayed development. Moderate to profound
HL (26%) and endocochlear damage (32%) were detected in the
ears of patients with microcephaly and cerebral palsy.
Conclusion This study revealed the importance of early HL de-
tection in microcephalic patients especially those with other handi-
caps such as delayed speech, delayed development, and cere-
bral palsy

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Mangunatmadja I, Widodo D, Pusponegoro H. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in children with microcephaly. PI [Internet]. 24Sep.2016 [cited 21Jul.2019];43(1):28-0. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/655
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Irawan Mangunatmadja

Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

Dwi Putro Widodo

Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta

Hardiono D Pusponegoro

Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta
Received 2016-09-22
Accepted 2016-09-22
Published 2016-09-24

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