Airway reversibility in newly developed asthma in children

Main Article Content

Ariyanto Harsono
Sri Kusumawardani
Makmuri MS
Gunadi Santosa

Abstract

Objective To determine factors influencing forced expiratory vol-
ume in one second (FEV 1 ) reversibility in newly developed asthma
in children
Methods A cross sectional study was done on 52 patients aged 6-
14 years who were recruited from a longitudinal study of 161 newly
developed asthmatic children. Pre and post-bronchodilator FEV 1
were obtained to calculate the reversibility. Seven patients had to
perform peak expiratory volume (PEV) variability before recruited.
Some variables including sex, age, height, onset of asthma, fre-
quency of asthma attacks at the time of the test were analyzed to
evaluate their roles in the outcome of FEV 1 reversibility using paired
sample t-test, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and multi regres-
sion analysis.
Results Mean pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV 1 were 1.14 (SD
0.24) and 1.31 (SD 0.28), respectively. FEV 1 reversibility ranged
between 6%-36%. Bivariate analyses demonstrated significant cor-
relation between either cough (p=0.031) or symptom-free (p=0.041)
and the airway reversibility. Multivariate analysis showed that cough
was an important factor influencing airway reversibility (p=0.0246).
Conclusion Cough is an important influencing factor of the air-
way reversibility

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Harsono A, Kusumawardani S, MS M, Santosa G. Airway reversibility in newly developed asthma in children. PI [Internet]. 24Sep.2016 [cited 22Nov.2019];43(1):1-. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/648
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Ariyanto Harsono

Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Airlangga, Surabaya, Indonesia

Sri Kusumawardani

Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Airlangga, Surabaya, Indonesia

Makmuri MS

Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Airlangga, Surabaya, Indonesia

Gunadi Santosa

Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Airlangga, Surabaya, Indonesia
Received 2016-09-21
Accepted 2016-09-21
Published 2016-09-24

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