Correlation between serum albumin and creatinine levels in children with nephrotic syndrome

Main Article Content

Gartika Sapartini
Dedi Rachmadi
Herry Garna

Abstract

Background Nephrotic syndrome is a glomerular disorder
characterized by massive proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, edema,
and hyperlipidemia. Hypoalbuminemia in nephrotic syndrome
leads to hypovolemia, a decrease in renal perfusion and glomerular
filtration rate. Serum creatinine level reflects the glomerular
filtration rate.
Objective The aim of this study was to determine the correlation
between serum albumin and creatinine levels in children with
nephrotic syndrome.
Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out on children with
idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, aged between 1 to 14 years old,
admitted to Pediatric Department in Hasan Sadikin Hospital
from January 2001 to September 2007. We used data from
patients' medical records to obtain serum albumin and creatinine
levels during nephrotic stage. Statistical analysis using Pearson
correlation test was performed to establish the correlation between
serum albumin and creatinine levels. The type of correlation was
determined by regression analysis.
Results Subjects were 113 children, consisted of 81 boys (72%)
with mean of age 6.8 (SD 3.3) years. Mean of serum albumin and
creatinine levels were 1.4 (SD 0.4) g/dL and 0.7 (SD 0.4) mg/
dL, respectively. Analysis using Pearson correlation test showed
a moderate (r=-0.478) significant correlation (P<O.Ol) between
serum albumin and creatinine levels in children with nephrotic
syndrome. Regression analysis suggested a negative linear
relationship between serum albumin level as the independent
variable (X) and serum creatinine level as the dependent variable
(Y) by using equation Y = 1.328-0.460X.
Conclusion In patients with nephrotic syndrome there is a
moderate negative correlation between serum albumin and
creatinine levels.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Sapartini G, Rachmadi D, Garna H. Correlation between serum albumin and creatinine levels in children with nephrotic syndrome. PI [Internet]. 15Sep.2016 [cited 29Sep.2020];48(6):354-. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/629
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Gartika Sapartini

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Padjadjaran
University, Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia.

Dedi Rachmadi

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Padjadjaran
University, Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia.

Herry Garna

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Padjadjaran
University, Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia.
Received 2016-09-14
Accepted 2016-09-14
Published 2016-09-15

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