Survival and prognostic factors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

  • Emelyana Permatasari
  • Endang Windiastuti
  • Hindra lrawan Satari
Keywords: lymphoblastic leukemia, acute, childhood, outcome studies, survival

Abstract

Background The treatment protocols of childhood acute
lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have been improved.
Some factors such as age, sex, and nutritional status could
influence therapy outcome.
Objective To study the survival differences among age, sex,
and nutritional status groups in childhood ALL.
Methods A retrospective Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of
childhood ALL was performed in Cipto Mangunkusumo
Hospital since January 1st 1998 until December 31st 2003.
We excluded patients aged < 1 years, those with L3 subtype,
patients with modified chemotherapy protocol, or with
incomplete data.
Results A total of 252 patients were analyzed. Overall
survival of 1-2 year old, > 2-< 10 year old, and 10-18 year
old subjects were 57% (95% CI 38 to 76%), 47% (95% CI
40 to 54%), and 35% (95% CI 21 to 49%) respectively (P
< 0.05). Five-year -event-free survival (EFS) of 1-2 year old,
> 2-< 10 year old, and 10-18 year old subjects were 40%,
40%, and 16%, respectively (P <0.05). Overall survival of
male and female subjects were 46% and 53% respectively
(P >0.05). Five-year-EFS of male and female subjects were
29% and 45% (P >0.05). Overall survival of well-nourished,
undernourished, and malnourished patients were 42%50%
and 57% respectively (P >0.05). The five-year-EFS of wellnourished, undernourished, and malnourished subjects were
33%,38%, and 51%, respectively (P >0.05).
Conclusion Childhood ALL aged 1-2 years had the highest
survival rate while those of 10-18 year old had the lowest. There
were no survival rate differences between sex and nutritional
status groups.

Author Biographies

Emelyana Permatasari
Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
Endang Windiastuti
Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
Hindra lrawan Satari
Department of Child Health, Medical School, University of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.

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Published
2009-12-31
How to Cite
1.
Permatasari E, Windiastuti E, Satari H. Survival and prognostic factors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PI [Internet]. 31Dec.2009 [cited 28May2024];49(6):365-1. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/603
Received 2016-09-12
Accepted 2016-09-12
Published 2009-12-31