Translocation ETS leukemia-acute myeloid leukemia 1 (TEL-AML1) gene fusion in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Main Article Content

Sri Mulatsih
Yeow Liang
Allen Yeoh
Sutaryo Sutaryo
Sunarto Sunarto

Abstract

Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children
is a heterogeneous disease with different subtypes based on their cellular and molecular characteristics. This condition would
influence the treatment outcome and subsequent risk for relapse. Accurate assignment of individual patients to risk groups is a critical issue for better outcome. TEL-AML1 gene fusion is the
most frequent in childhood ALL.
Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence
ofTEL-AML1 children with ALL in Sardjito Hospital.
Methods This was a cross sectional study. In this preliminary
study, we used nested reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain
reaction (RT-PCR) to analyze the present of TEL-AML1 gene
fusion in bone marrow sample of childhood ALL patients.
Results We analyzed 41 samples. Out of these, 30 (73%) were
amplified. Twenry three out of 30 ALL patients with good medical
record were analyzed for this gene fusion. Out of 30 patients, there were five patients (17%) with TEL-AML1-positive gene fusion and 25 (83%) were TEL-AML1-negative. Among five patients with TEL-AML1-positive gene fusion, four patients (80%) were one year to less than 10 year old. All of the patients (100%) were with leukocyte < 50x109/L.
Conclusions TEL-AML1 gene fusion was found in 17 % of
samples. This gene fusion was more frequent in standard risk group (based on age and leukocyte). These data must be clarified with more samples. RT-PCR must be apply in all center as one part of improving diagnostic quality, especially in managing leukemia patients.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Mulatsih S, Liang Y, Yeoh A, Sutaryo S, Sunarto S. Translocation ETS leukemia-acute myeloid leukemia 1 (TEL-AML1) gene fusion in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PI [Internet]. 31Oct.2009 [cited 11Jul.2020];49(5):270-. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/582
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Sri Mulatsih

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Gadjah Mada University, Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Yeow Liang

Department of Child Health, Loo Lin Medical School, National University Singapore, Singapore

Allen Yeoh

Department of Child Health, Loo Lin Medical School, National University Singapore, Singapore

Sutaryo Sutaryo

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Gadjah Mada University, Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Sunarto Sunarto

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Gadjah Mada University, Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Received 2016-09-11
Accepted 2016-09-11
Published 2009-10-31

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