Influence of socioeconomic status on the association between low weight at birth and stunted growth or overweight in rural and urban Indonesian prepubertal children

Main Article Content

Madarina Julia
M. M. van Weissenbruch
H. A. Delemarre-van de Waal
Achmad Surjono

Abstract

Background Low birth weight (LBW) has been associated with in-
creased risk for both stunted growth andand overweight later in life.
Objective To assess relative contribution of LBW on the preva-
lence of stunted growth or overweight in rural and urban Indo-
nesian children in Indonesia.
Methods This is a cross-sectional survey of 2 833 (1125 rural and
1708 urban) school-aged prepubertal children. Each child had data
on age, sex, stature, BMI (body mass index) and birth weight.
Results Compared to the urban population, the prevalence of
stunted growth was significantly higher in the rural, i.e. 16.3 vs.
32.7%, P<O.OOl. However, there was no significant difference iin
n the prevalence of LBW in the two communities. While overall,
stunted children were more likely to be born with LBW, OR 1.80
(95%CI 1.31; 2.47), P<O.OOl. After stratifying data into rural and
urban residences, the contribution of LBW on the risk of stunted
growth appeared to be only significant in the urban population, OR
2.42 (95%CI 1.59; 3.68), P<O.OOl. In the rural, similar proportions
of LBW were found in stunted and not stunted children. Test of in-
teraction showed that this difference in OR was significant, the ratio
of OR 1.88 (95%CI 1.11; 3.17), P=0.02. We observed no association
between LBW and overweight.
Conclusions In rural area, LBW is not an important contributor
for stunted growth, while in urbanarea LBW is an important risk
factor for stunted growth. As there is no significant difference in
the prevalence of LBW between the two communities, the dif-
ference in the prevalence of stunted growth is more likely to be
associated with different pattern of post-natal growth

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Julia M, van Weissenbruch M, Delemarre-van de Waal H, Surjono A. Influence of socioeconomic status on the association between low weight at birth and stunted growth or overweight in rural and urban Indonesian prepubertal children. PI [Internet]. 31Aug.2008 [cited 22Nov.2019];48(4):214-. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/570
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Madarina Julia

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Gadjah Mada
University, Dr. sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

M. M. van Weissenbruch

Department of Pediatrics and Research Institute for Clinical and
Experimental Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

H. A. Delemarre-van de Waal

Department of Pediatrics and Research Institute for Clinical and
Experimental Neurosciences, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Achmad Surjono

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Gadjah Mada
University, Dr. sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Received 2016-09-10
Accepted 2016-09-10
Published 2008-08-31

References

1. UNICEE The state of the world's children 2005. [cited on
2005 June 10 ] Available from: url; http://www.unicef.org/
sowc05/english/sowc05 _Tables. pdf.
2. Caulfield LE, de Orris M, Blossner M, Black RE. Undernutri-
tion as an underlying cause of child deaths associated with
diarrhea, pneumonia, malaria, and measles. Am J Clin Nutr
2004;80: 193-8.
3. Pelletier DL, Frongillo EA, Jr. Schroeder DG, Habicht JP.
The effects of malnutrition on child mortality in developing
countries. Bull World Health Organ 1995;73:443-8.
4. Mendez MA, Adair LS. Severity and timing of stunting in the
first two years of life affect performance on cognitive tests in
late childhood. J Nutr 1999; 129:1555-62.
5. Albertsson-Wikland K, Wennergren G, Wennergren M,
Vilbergsson G, Rosberg S. Longitudinal follow-up of growth
in children born small for gestational age. Acta Paediatr
6. 1993;82:438-43.
Adair LS, Guilkey DK. Age-specific determinants of stunting
7. Veening MA, van Weissenbruch MM, Delemarre-van de
in filipino children. J Nutr 1997; 127:314-20.
Waal H. Glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and insulin
secretion in children born small for gestational age.
J Clin Endocrinol Me tab 2002;87 :4657-61.
8. Adair LS. Filipino children exhibit catch-up growth from age
2 to 12 years. J Nutr 1999;129:1140-8.
9. Shrimpton R, Victora CG, de Onis M, Lima RC, Bloss-
ner M, Clugston G. Worldwide timing of growth falter-
ing: implications for nutritional interventions. Pediatrics
2001;107:E75.
10. Schmidt MK, Muslimatun S, West CE, Schultink W, Gross
R, Hautvast JG. Nutritional status and linear growth of
Indonesian infants in West Java are determined more by
prenatal environment than by postnatal factors. J Nutr
2002; 13 2:2202-7.
11. de Onis M, Blossner M. Prevalence and trends of overweight
among preschool children in developing countries. Am J Clin
Nutr. 2000;72:1032-9.
12. Popkin BM, Richards MK, Montiero CA. Stunting is asso-
ciated with overweight in children of four nations that are
undergoing the nutrition transition. J Nutr 1996; 126:3009-
16.
13. Hoffman DJ, Sawaya AL, Verreschi I, Tucker KL, Roberts
SB. Why are nutritionally stunted children at increased risk
of obesity? Studies of metabolic rate and fat oxidation in
shantytown children from Sao Paulo, Brazil. Am J Clin Nutr
2000;72:702-7.
14. Sawaya AL, Grillo LP, Verreschi I, DaSilva AC, Roberts SB.
Mild stunting is associated with higher susceptibility to the
effects of high fat diets: studies in a shantytown population
in Sao Paulo, Brazil. J Nutr 1998;128:S415-20.
15. Ong KKL, Ahmed ML, Emmett PM, Preece MA, Dunger
DB. Association between postnatal catch-up growth
and obesity in childhood: prospective cohort study. BMJ
2000;320:967 -71.
16. Stettler N, Kumanyika SK, Katz SH, Zemel BS, Stallings
VA. Rapid weight gain during infancy and obesity in young
adulthood in a cohort of African Americans. Am] Clin Nutr
2003;77:1374-8.
17. BPS-Statistics ofD.I.Yogyakarta Province. Daerah Istimewa
Yogyakarta in figures 1999. Yogyakarta, Indonesia, BPS-
Statistics of D.I.Yogyakarta Province.
18. World Health Organization. Measuring change in nutri-
tional status: guidelines for assessing the nutritional impact
of supplementary feeding programme in vulnerable groups.
Geneva: WHO Press; 1983.
19. Kuczmarski RJ, Ogden CL, Guo SS, Grummer-Strawn LM,
Flegal KM, Mei Z, et al. 2000 CDC Growth Charts for the
United States: methods and development. Vital Health
Stat.11. 2002; 1-190.
20. World Health Organization. Physical status: the use and in-
terpretation of anthropometry. Geneva: WHO Press; 1995.
21. Altman DG,.Bland JM. Statistics Notes: Interaction
revisited: the difference between two estimates. BMJ
2003;326:219.
22. Julia M, Surjono A, Hakimi M. Role ofbreastfeeding in protect-
ing children from malnutrition: A comparative study of nutri-
tional status in children under two years of age in two districts
in Indonesia. Paediatr Indones 2002;42: 106-12.
23. Ekelund U, Ong K, LinneY, Neovius M, Brage S, Dunger DB,
Wareham NJ, Rossner S. Upward weight percentile crossing in
infancy and early childhood independently predicts fat mass
in young adults: the Stockholm Weight Development Study
(SWEDES). Am J Clin Nutr 2006;83:324-30.
24. Parsons TJ, Power C, Manor 0. Fetal and early life growth
and body mass index from birth to early adulthood in 1958
British cohort: longitudinal study. BMJ 2001;323: 1331-5.