Effect of egg avoidance diet by nursing mothers on the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants

Main Article Content

Neti Nurani
Endy Paryanto Prawirohartono
A. Samik Wahab

Abstract

Background The prevalence of allergic and atopic diseases has
increased rapidly and remains a social as well as an economic
problem for the patients on account of its chronic nature. In order
to decrease the atopic diseases, especially atopic dermatitis in
infants, nursing mothers should avoid allergenic foods as a
preventive sensitization. Egg allergy is the most common cause of
food allergy, and is closely related to atopic dermatitis in children.
Objective To determine whether egg avoidance diet by nursing
mothers could decrease the incidence of atopic dermatitis in
infants.
Method We conducted a parallel randomized-controlled trial.
Seventy-nine subjects eligible for the study were divided into two
groups: egg avoidance and non-egg avoidance group. Block
randomization is used for random allocation. Intervention started
since mothers had had delivery until their children were 4 months
old. The primary outcomes were clinical atopic dermatitis.
Result Atopic dermatitis incidence in maternal egg avoidance
group was significantly lower than non-avoidance group. Non-
avoidance, family history of asthma, and maternal allergy are the
factors significantly influencing atopic dermatitis incidence (OR
6.17; OR 4.73; OR 0.14), respectively.
Conclusion Egg avoidance by nursing mothers could decrease the
incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants. Non-egg avoidance and
asthma in the families are factors significantly inducing the incidence
of atopic dermatitis.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Nurani N, Prawirohartono E, Wahab A. Effect of egg avoidance diet by nursing mothers on the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants. PI [Internet]. 1May2008 [cited 9Jul.2020];48(2):71-. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/481
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Neti Nurani

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Gadjah Mada
University, Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

Endy Paryanto Prawirohartono

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Gadjah Mada
University, Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

A. Samik Wahab

Department of Child Health, Medical School, Gadjah Mada
University, Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
Received 2016-09-07
Accepted 2016-09-07
Published 2008-05-01

References

1. Bottcher MF. Cytokines and chemokines in breast milk from
allergic and nonallergic mothers. Allergy Clin Immunol
2000;12:153-60.
2. Pascual CY, Crespo JF, Perez PG. Food allergy and intolerance
in children and adolescents, an up date. Eur J Clin Nutr
2000;54:S75-8.
3. Leung DY, Boguniewicz, Howell MD, Nomura I, Hamid QA.
New insight into atopic dermatitis. J Clin Invest; 2004;
113:651-7.
4. Burk WA. Childhood food allergy. Immunology and allergy.
Clin North America 1999;19:397-407.
5. Santoso H. Food hypersensitivity as a cause of atopic
dermatitis. Pediatr Indones 1996;36:9-10.
6. Anibarro B, Seoane FJ, Vila C, Lombardero M. Allergy to
egg from duck and goose without sensitisation to hens egg
protein. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2000; 105:834-6.
7. Poulsen LK, Hansen TK, Norgaard A. Alergens from fish
and egg. Allergy 2001;56:S39-42.
8. Duchen K, Thorell L. Nucleotide and polyamine levels in
colostrum and mature milk in realation to maternal atopy and
atopic development in the children. Acta Paediatrica
1999;88:1338-43.
9. Hourihane JO’B. Peanut allergy in relation to heredity,
maternal diet, and other atopic disease: result of ques-
tionnaire survey, skin prick testing and food challanges. BMJ
1996;313:518-21.
10. Fukushima Y, Kawata Y, Onda T, Kitagawa M. Consumption
of cow milk and egg by nursing women and the presence of
beta-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin in breast milk. Am J Clin
Nutr 1997;65:30-5.
11. Hanifin JM, Rajka G. Diagnostic feature of atopic dermatitis.
Acta Dermatol Venereol 1980;92:44-7.
12. Chandra RK, Puri S, Hamed A. Influence of maternal diet
during lactation and use of formula feeds on development
of atopic eczema in high risk infants. BMJ 1989;299:228-
30.
13. Sigurs N, Hattevig G, Kjellman B. Maternal avoidance of
eggs, cow’s milk, and fish during lactation: effect on
allergic manifestations, skin-prick test, and specific Ig E
antibodies in children at age 4 years. Pediatrics 1992;89:
735-9.
14. Marini A, Agosti M, Motta G, Mosca F. Effects of a dietary
and environmental prevention programme on the incidence
of allergic symptoms in high atopic Risk infants: three years’
follow-up. Acta Paediatr 1996;414:1-21.
15. Buhrer C, Grimmer I, Niggemann B, Obladen M. Low 1 year
prevalence of atopic eczema in very low birthweight infant.
Lancet 1999;353:1674.
16. Hikino S, Nakayama H, Yamamoto J, Kinukawa N, Sakamoto
M, Hara T. Food allergy and atopic dermatitis in low
birthweight infant during early childhood. Acta Pediatr
2001;90:850-5.
17. Warner JA, Jones AC, Miles EA, Warner JO. Prenatal
sensitization. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 1996;7:98-101.
18. Litonjua AA, Carey VJ, Burge HA, Weiss ST, Gold DR.
Parental history and the risk for childhood asthma, does
mother confer more risk than father?. Am J Respir Crit Care
Med 1998;158:176-81.
19. Sicherer S, Sally A, Furlong AM. The impact of childhood
food allergy on quality of life. The Food Allergy and
Anaphylaxis Network 2001;87:461-4.