Quality of home stimulation and language development in children aged 12-24 months living in orphanages and family homes

Main Article Content

Yuridyah P. Mulyadi
Soedjatmiko Soedjatmiko
Hardiono D. Pusponegoro

Abstract

Background  Language development  is  fundamental for children's
intellectual development. Therefore, early stimulation in the
first  three  years  of  life play an  important  role especially in
disadvantaged communities such  as  foster homes.
Objective  To  determine  the  quality  of  home stimulation  and
language development, and their correlations in children living
in orphanages  and  family homes.
Methods  This study was conducted between December  2007  and
January  2008.  Subjects were recruited from several orphanages
in Jakarta, Tangerang, Bogor, also three posyandus in Jakarta and
Tangerang.  The  quality  of  home stimulation was assessed using
Home  Stimulation  Observation  for  the  Measurement  of  the
Environment (HOME) scores, while language development was
assessed using Clinical Linguistic and Auditory Milestone Scale
Development  Quotient  (CLAMS  DQ).
Results  A total  of  80  healthy children, consisting  of  40  children
in orphanages  and  40  in family homes were enrolled. Inadequate
stimulation and language delay were found  to  be significantly
higher in the orphanage group  (52.5%  vs.  27.5%; P=0.022  and
57.5%  vs.  10%; P<0.001,  respectively).  HOME  Scores  and
CLAMS  DQ  were also significantly lower in  the  orphanage
group compared to those  in  the family home group  (25.6  vs
31.5; P<0.001  and  84.0  vs  110.7; P=0.002).  Logistic regression
revealed  that  caregiver-child  attachment  time was  the  only
risk factor  for  language delay  (OR  32.32; P<0.0001),  in  both
orphanages and family homes.
Result  The  quality of home stimulation  is  lower in the orphanages,
which results in a higher rate  of  language delay  in  children aged
12-24  months.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Mulyadi Y, Soedjatmiko S, Pusponegoro H. Quality of home stimulation and language development in children aged 12-24 months living in orphanages and family homes. PI [Internet]. 1Mar.2009 [cited 15Aug.2020];49(1):25-2. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/452
Section
Articles
Author Biographies

Yuridyah P. Mulyadi

Department  of  Child Health, Medical School, University  of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.

Soedjatmiko Soedjatmiko

Department  of  Child Health, Medical School, University  of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.

Hardiono D. Pusponegoro

Department  of  Child Health, Medical School, University  of
Indonesia, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
Received 2016-09-05
Accepted 2016-09-05
Published 2009-03-01

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