Clinical profiles of neonates born to mothers with COVID-19

Main Article Content

Ambili Susan Jacob
Mohammed MTP
Reetha Gopinath
Binoo Divakaran
Tariq Harris

Abstract

Background The risk of congenital infections in neonates born to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected mothers and those breastfed by infected mothers remains largely unknown.


Objective To describe the outcomes and clinical features of neonates born to mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy, to follow up neonates who were positive for SARS-CoV-2 at the time of delivery for a period of 1 month, and to identify potential risk factors associated with disease transmission.


Methods This prospective observational study on neonates born to SARS-CoV-2-infected mothers between June 2020 and January 2021 was carried out after getting written informed consent in a tertiary care government hospital (Government Medical college Kannur, North Kerala, India). The clinical and demographic characteristics of infected mothers were reviewed. Neonates were tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection within 24 hours of birth, with repeat testing on day 5 for those who were negative at birth.  The demographic and clinical characteristics as well as potential risk factors for disease transmission in these neonates were evaluated.


Results A total of 342 neonates (95.3%) were tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection at birth. Rooming-in and breastfeeding was practiced in 75% of at-risk neonates. Fifty neonates tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection at birth (14.3%); 293 neonates who tested negative at birth remained so on day 5, except one baby isolated with a caretaker who also tested positive, indicating postnatal infection. There was no statistically significant increased risk of infection in neonates born to SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers compared to those born to mothers who had already become negative at delivery. Mild symptoms were present in 8% of positive neonates. On one-month follow up, all neonates were well and gaining weight.


Conclusion Vertical transmission, in particular transplacental, may be possible in SARS-CoV-2-infected mothers. Maternal infection at the time of delivery is not a predictor for increased vertical transmission compared to mothers whose infections had resolved prior to delivery. Breastfeeding with appropriate hygiene measures is not a risk factor for horizontal transmission.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Jacob A, MTP M, Gopinath R, Divakaran B, Harris T. Clinical profiles of neonates born to mothers with COVID-19. PI [Internet]. 20Sep.2021 [cited 6Dec.2021];61(5):277-2. Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/2722
Section
Neonatology
Author Biographies

Ambili Susan Jacob, GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE,KANNUR

Assistant Professor,Pediatrics

Mohammed MTP, GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE,KANNUR

Professor and Head of Department,Pediatrics

Reetha Gopinath, GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE,KANNUR

Professor,Pediatrics

Binoo Divakaran, GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE,KANNUR

Assistant Professor,Statistics,Department of Community Medicine

Tariq Harris, GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE,KANNUR

Senior Resident,Pediatrics

Received 2021-07-14
Accepted 2021-09-20
Published 2021-09-20

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