Psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on doctors’ children: are we heading towards a mental health pandemic?

Main Article Content

Riffat Omer
Humayun Iqbal Khan
Muhammad Khalid Masood
Najaf Masood
Fatima Tahira

Abstract

Background The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) may affect the behavior of children.


Non infected children of doctors seem to be susceptible to psychosocial health disorders.


Objective To assess the psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on children of doctors.


Methods This questionnaire-based survey filled up by doctors was done with the Pediatric Symptom Check List-17 (PSC-17) to assess the psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on doctors’ children aged 10-15 years with no clinical evidence of being infected with coronavirus and possible  contributing factors to mental distress/psychosocial health disorders. A PSC -17 Score of ≥15 was considered as a significant indicator of suspected psychosocial impact.


Results Children’s mean age was 12.5 (SD 1.9) years, and 53.8% of them were male. Of 357 questionnaire responses, 36.1% had a significant PSC-17 score (>15) and a small, but significant inverse correlation was observed with age (r=-0.147; P=0.005).  More screen time than usual was perceived by doctors to be the most common potential contributing factor (63%) to their children’s psychosocial impact.


Conclusion The COVID-19 pandemic is likely to leave lasting effects on children’s mental health. Parents should closely monitor children for any changes in psychosocial behavior, so that timely intervention can be considered. Psychosocial screening of children is needed and should be conducted at schools.

Article Details

How to Cite
1.
Omer R, Khan H, Masood M, Masood N, Tahira F. Psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on doctors’ children: are we heading towards a mental health pandemic?. PI [Internet]. 1Feb.2021 [cited 7Mar.2021];61(1). Available from: https://paediatricaindonesiana.org/index.php/paediatrica-indonesiana/article/view/2464
Section
Developmental Behavioral & Community Pediatrics
Author Biographies

Humayun Iqbal Khan, Services Institute of Medical Sciences/Services Hospital, Lahore, Punjab

 Professor of Pediatric Medicine

MBBS, FCPS (Pediatric medicine), FCPS (BD), CMT

Department of Pediatric medicine

Services Institute of Medical Sciences/Services Hospital

Lahore

Pakistan

Muhammad Khalid Masood, Services Institute of Medical Sciences/Services Hospital, Lahore, Punjab

Associate Professor of Pediatric Medicine

MBBS, FCPS (Pediatric medicine)

Department of Pediatric medicine

Services Institute of Medical Sciences/Services Hospital

Lahore

Pakistan

Najaf Masood, Services Institute of Medical Sciences/Services Hospital, Lahore, Punjab

Associate Professor of Pediatric Medicine

MBBS,MCPS , FCPS (Pediatric medicine)

Department of Pediatric medicine

Services Institute of Medical Sciences/Services Hospital

Lahore

Pakistan

Fatima Tahira, Services Institute of Medical Sciences/Services Hospital, Lahore, Punjab

Assistant Professor of Pediatric Medicine

MBBS, FCPS (Pediatric medicine), MRCPCH, MRCPS, MRCPE

Department of Pediatric medicine

Services Institute of Medical Sciences/Services Hospital

Lahore

Received 2020-08-10
Accepted 2021-02-01
Published 2021-02-01

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